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October 2019

Innovation Zone Snapshot – Edible seaweed-based capsules contain special edition whisky

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Innovation Zone ThePackHub - thepackhub.com

 

Welcome to this week’s Innovation Zone snapshot from ThePackHub.

ThePackHub collates up to 20 new packaging innovations every week. We have selected four brand new initiatives that we hope will be on interest to you below.

Special offer – Save £400 – Get your Top Packaging Supplier Guide 2019 for just £299 while stocks last. Order yours and save here.

 

You can join over 3,500 others and stay up to speed on the latest packaging news from ThePackHub by following us on LinkedIn – www.linkedin.com/company/thepackhub

#1 Edible seaweed-based capsules contain special edition whisky

Glenlivet Whisky has a distillery near Ballindalloch in Moray, Scotland. The brand has introduced the ‘Capsule Collection’ of edible capsules made from seaweed. Each one contains a special edition of Founders Reserve based whisky recipes.  The capsule was invented and manufactured by UK based company Notpla (formerly Skipping Rocks Lab). See Seaweed-based sauce sachets decompose within six weeks. They were also responsible for the production of forty two thousand capsules filled with Lucozade sports drink for this year’s London Marathon. The Glenlivet Capsule Collection is available in just one bar in London for a limited period. Notpla is currently developing and testing out further products that include crisp packets, pasta sachets and dry goods packaging.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#2 Soap used to create packaging-free shampoo and shower gel range

New packaging developed by a Berlin-based designer aims to replace single-use plastic with a more environmentally-friendly alternative that leaves no trace.  Soapbottle is the brainchild of Jonna Breitenhuber and sees the creation of a pack for shampoo and shower gel made from soap. The biodegradable concept effectively turns the product itself into its own packaging to completely avoid any waste that can be completely avoided. The remains of the bottle can be used as hand soap or reprocessed into detergents or cleaning agents. The soap packaging is not the perfect solution from a functional perspective. Unlike plastic, it is unbreakable, is water soluble and also becomes slippery when used.  However, this does look a more viable alternative to another solution the Innovation Zone reported of this type recently Shampoo packaging made out of soap is probably not the next big bathroom item.

More info in The Innovation Zone.

#3 Glass beer bottle recycling machines start Brazilian trial

The Heineken Group is making it easier for Brazilian consumers to recycle their glass beer bottles with the introduction of nine machines placed in Pão de Açúcar and Extra supermarkets. The Volte Semper grinding machines form part of Heineken’s More With Less Movement that seeks to promote the correct disposal of packaging waste. Any beer bottle of any size from any brand can be disposed for onsite crushing. The consumer will receive R $0.10 (£0.02) cashback for each glass bottle deposited. When a R $20 balance is achieved, the consumer can redeem the amount to their bank account. The machines are owned by Seiva Coleta, a glass processing business in Minas Gerais. Technology allows for the communication to the logistics partner when a unit reaches 70% of its capacity to automatically request a waste collection, which is carried out by motorcyclists. See also Reverse vending scheme starts Brazil market roll out.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#4 Marine plastic recycling is a food and drink packaging first

As part of Coca-Cola’s 2025 Sustainability Action Plan pledge they will collect a can or bottle for every one that it sells as well as ensure that all of its packaging is 100% recyclable and that its plastic bottles will have at least 50% recycled content. The business continues to introduce initiatives to progress this vision with the development of a bottle made from 25% recycled marine plastic. The material has been retrieved from the Mediterranean Sea and beach areas and is a first for use in food and drink packaging. The Innovation Zone has noted initiatives using ocean plastic for personal care, industrial and household applications previously. See for example Dishwasher detergent pack made from plastic from the sea.  Coca Cola have created 300 proof of concept prototypes following a collaboration with Ioniqa Technologies, Indorama Ventures and Mares Circulare. Ioniqa is a clean-tech spinoff from the Eindhoven University of Technology that specialises in creating value out of plastic waste.

More info in The Innovation Zone.


Please visit ThePackHub or call us on +44(0)118 963 9990 to find out more about the range of packaging innovation services we offer. We’ve delivered projects for a number of brand owner, retailer and packaging suppliers.

Until next time. Happy innovating.


October 2019

Innovation Zone Snapshot – Digitally printed cup is made directly from the label

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Innovation Zone ThePackHub - thepackhub.com

 

Welcome to this week’s Innovation Zone snapshot from ThePackHub.
ThePackHub collates up to 20 new packaging innovations every week. We have selected four brand new initiatives that we hope will be on interest to you below.

 

ThePackHub collates up to 20 new packaging innovations every week. We have selected four brand new initiatives that we hope will be on interest to you below.
You can join over 3,000 others and stay up to speed on the latest packaging news from ThePackHub by following us on LinkedIn – www.linkedin.com/company/thepackhub

#1 Digitally printed cup is made directly from the label

A distinctive new patent-pending label-based beverage cup is being introduced by start-up company Cup-It in what is being claimed is the next-generation of labels. The business is using digitally printed cups that are constructed directly from the label. The label-to-pouch application uses a peel and tear strip to remove the label from the bottle so that individual pouches can be removed from the whole label. The label is opened up and formed into cups that can be directly drunk from and is seen as a practical way to share the contents of large drink bottles. The solution is seen as a plastic-waste reducing approach to label printing.  The labels are digitally printed offering short runs, the ability to create multiple SKUs, pack versioning and a speedy turnaround. The labels offer brands a great promotional tool for outdoor and sporting events as well as for sales promotions. The video below helps to bring the innovation to life.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#2 Paper-based cosmetics tube set to shake up market

L’Oréal have announced the exciting development of a paper-based tube that could shake up the cosmetics market. The breakthrough innovation briught to market alongside Gennevilliers, France-based cosmetic packaging experts Albéa meets the need that many cosmetic brand owners have to reduce the amount of plastic packaging. It is reported to be the first carton-based cosmetic tube, where plastic is for the most part replaced with a certified paper-like material. Its full benefits to the environment will be assessed through a multi-criteria Life Cycle Analysis. The new technological solution has a target first market launch for skincare products for the second half of 2020. See also Tube packs promise to simplify tea drinking on-the-go.

More info in The Innovation Zone.

#3 Online refill pouches include postal recycle scheme

Scottish distillery Dunnet Bay has announced the introduction of a fully recyclable pouch for its Rock Rose gin brand. Rock Rose is well known in the market for its collectable hand signed ceramic bottles that are popular with drinkers. Shoppers are encouraged to keep their previously bought bottles and order 70cl pouches to refill their bottles. The pouch weighs 65 grams compared to 700 grams for a bottle. The pouches have been designed to fit through letterboxes. There is a significant saving of £4 over the price of ordering a new ceramic bottle. The pouches can be returned to Dunnet Bay via a freepost postal recycling scheme. A four layer laminate pouch has been designed to lock in all the freshness of the gin, with an easy-to-use plastic spout closure. The refill solution will be recycled by TerraCycle. Dunnet Bay are also offering in-store refills at their distillery retaill outlet.  See also Pouch refills create ‘bottles for life’ spirit packaging.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#4 Refillable milk scheme proves popular with shoppers

A retailer is tackling the challenge of single-use use packaging with the introduction of a refillable milk scheme. Siop Ellis in Anglesey, Wales has taken steps to tackle the problem of plastic waste by installing a milk machine for customers to fill their bottles themselves. Shoppers can buy reusable glass bottles from the outlet or can bring in their own containers. The outlet has a 14 litre tank, which with current demand is emptied and replenished around three times per day. The machine dispenses locally-sourced, semi-skimmed milk.  This is the first example we have tracked of dispensing milk with most of the refillable examples tracked so far from the health and beauty and household sectors.  The initiative ties in with the recent announcement that Anglesey has become the first county in the UK to be awarded ‘plastic free’ community status. See also Refillable shower gel station is nod to the past.

More info in The Innovation Zone.


 

Please visit ThePackHub or call us on +44(0)118 963 9990 to find out more about the range of packaging innovation services we offer. We’ve delivered projects for a number of brand owner, retailer and packaging suppliers.

Until next time. Happy innovating.


September 2019

Innovation Zone Snapshot – Compostable wrap tackles cucumber packaging challenge

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Innovation Zone ThePackHub - thepackhub.com

 

Welcome to this week’s Innovation Zone snapshot from ThePackHub.
ThePackHub collates up to 20 new packaging innovations every week. We have selected four brand new initiatives that we hope will be on interest to you below.

 

ThePackHub’s 10th packaging seminar Sustainable Packaging Innovations 2019 is this week on Thursday 3rd October –  We will be joined by delegates from Coca Cola, Pret, Waitrose, Premier Foods, Mars Petcare, Lavazza, BAT, Twinings, Innocent Drinks, PepsiCo, Baylis & Harding and more. We have some great presentations covering a range of sustainable packaging subjects including Enval, Happen, RPC bpi, TIPA, API, Colliods, GAIA Biomaterials, Essentra and much more.  Find out more and book your place here.

You can also join over 3,000 others and stay up to speed on the latest packaging news by following ThePackHub on LinkedIn – www.linkedin.com/company/thepackhub


#1 Compostable wrap tackles cucumber packaging challenge

The plastic wrap used to extend the shelf life of cucumbers is often held up as the example for debating the virtues of plastic used in packaging. Pro parties claim the material adds vital days to the life of the product whilst detractors claim the single-use unrecyclable material should not be used. South Australian produce business IG Fresh Produce and packaging company Peak Fresh have made the debate slightly harder with the development of a 100% biodegradable compostable cucumber wrap.  This has been developed for use by independent supermarket business, Drakes Supermarkets in their 38 stores in South Australia and replaces the traditional shrink-wrap. Claimed to be a game changer for the supermarket and grocery industry, the product development took 12 months. Future plans for the biodegradable and compostable wrap include other fresh fruit packaging and meat products. Following the Drakes Supermarkets trial the plan is to make the product available to other supermarket chains.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#2 Cheese brand uses NFC tags to engage with shoppers

The growth and development of NFC tags for packaging applications has thus far been mainly for high end and premium sectors such as perfume and alcohol. Kraft Heinz is challenging this convention with the introduction of a mobile-activated pack for Kraft Singles cheese. The relatively low priced packs with be available from Walmart. The NFC tags creates an interactive mobile experience for shoppers to use their smartphones to engage with the brand on a number of different levels. They can get a coupon, see recipe suggestions or enter a competition. The packaging interacts with the near-field communications (NFC) chip in modern smartphones. This is a more interactive way than the use of a QR code printed on pack to engage with consumers. Kraft Heinz gets vital marketing information such as email, state of residence and date of birth to enter the contest. Kraft Heinz worked with marketing technology company TPG Rewards to offer the solution.

More info in The Innovation Zone.

#3 Printable RFID paper sheets developed for labels

Moscow, Russia headquartered company ISBC Group has developed printable RFID paper that can be used to create packaging labels. The ready-to-print sheets are an alternative to the traditional method of RFID tags on rolls.  The new technology involves RFID chips and antennas being built into sheets and has a positioning accuracy of the antenna is within one tenth of a millimetre. ISBC Group’s aim is to make RFID technologies as affordable as any usual sheet-to-sheet printing. The integrated circuits and antennas can be positioned in the paper according to the requirements of print houses. There are no visual bumps in the paper after printing, which can be achieved using HP Indigo printers. The tags are able to withstand both heating and cooling during the printing process. The solution results in a cost of around 20 cents (16 pence) per tag. In time, it will be possible to build the paper using ISBC’s new printing technology allowing print houses the opportunity to personalise the labels inside the sheets.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#4 Lettuce and artichoke remains used to make new packaging

A Spanish start-up has developed an innovative process to manufacture packaging materials from agricultural vegetable waste. Feltwood Raw Material have developed a technology that produces environmentally-friendly industrial materials from agricultural plant waste, without adding any plastic, adhesive or binder.  The food and agricultural economies generates a large amount of waste. The parts of lettuce or artichoke that are not eaten, as well as other sorts of plant waste, go through an industrial process in order for new materials to be manufactured. The plant waste is moulded to create products that are 100% biodegradable, recyclable and compostable. The materials are made from plant fibers extracted from more than 30 different sorts of plant waste. The list of crops used includes lettuce, artichoke and pineapple. Feltwood have developed four iterations so far. ‘Insulation’ is focused on the construction sector. ‘Anti-Impact’ has properties for protective packaging. ‘Pack’ can be used for the light packaging industry and ‘Hard’ is intended for furniture applications.

More info in The Innovation Zone.


 

Please visit ThePackHub or call us on +44(0)118 963 9990 to find out more about the range of packaging innovation services we offer. We’ve delivered projects for a number of brand owner, retailer and packaging suppliers.

Until next time. Happy innovating.


September 2019

Innovation Zone Snapshot – Plastic shrink-wrap replaced with cardboard for consumer multipacks

Read more ›

Innovation Zone ThePackHub - thepackhub.com

 

Welcome to this week’s Innovation Zone snapshot from ThePackHub.
ThePackHub collates up to 20 new packaging innovations every week. We have selected four brand new initiatives that we hope will be on interest to you below.

 

ThePackHub’s 10th packaging seminar Sustainable Packaging Innovations 2019 is next week on Thursday 3rd October –  We will be joined by delegates from Coca Cola, Pret, Waitrose, Premier Foods, Mars Petcare, Lavazza, BAT, Twinings, Innocent Drinks and more. We have some great presentations covering a range of sustainable packaging subjects including Enval, Happen, RPC bpi, TIPA, API, Colliods, GAIA Biomaterials, Essentra and much more.  Find out more and book your place here.

ThePackHub’s Top Supplier Guide is out now. Find out more and order here.

You can also join over 3,000 others and stay up to speed on the latest packaging news by following ThePackHub on LinkedIn – www.linkedin.com/company/thepackhub


#1 Plastic shrink-wrap replaced with cardboard for consumer multipacks

The move to replace plastic in consumer good brands continues at a pace. Coca-Cola has a policy to reduce the amount of the material in their business and has announced that they will no longer use plastic shrink-wrap on can multipacks sold for the UK market initially and rolled out to Europe. A transition to recyclable cardboard will take place over the next 18 months across their range of carbonated soft drink brands. Four, six and eight packs of cans will be packaged in 100% recyclable, sustainably-sourced cardboard. The move will remove 4,000 tonnes of plastic from circulation.  The shrink-wrap being replaced is already recyclable, but only approximately 10% of UK local authorities currently collect the material. This compares to just about all (98%) of local authorities collect cardboard. Multipacks of 10 cans are already collated in cardboard. See also Recyclable cardboard sleeve to replace plastic wrap for leading beer brand.

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#2 Plastic-free barrier paperboard for food is easy to recycle

Leading European producer of fresh fibre paperboard, Metsä Board has developed a new plastic-free barrier paperboard for food applications. The MetsäBoard Prime FBB EB is made of fresh fibres from sustainably managed forests. The FSC certified material is safe for direct food contact and free from fluorochemicals. Prime FBB EB has a medium barrier against moisture and grease making it particularly suitable for food and food service packaging applications. It is claimed to be the brightest OBA (Optical Brightening Agent)-free board on the market that delivers excellent printability. The barrier board is plastic-free. Importantly, it does not require a plastic separation process so it is easy and inexpensive to recycle. Its lightweight configuration helps to contribute to a reduction in carbon footprint throughout the whole supply chain. See also Food industry cardboard grades are plastic-free.

More info in The Innovation Zone.

#3 Refillable shower gel station is nod to the past

The Body Shop now has some 3,000 stores in more than 60 countries. Like all retailers, it is under pressure to reduce the amount of packaging in the business. The cosmetics, skin care and perfume retailer has announced a new initiative that sees a refillable shower gel system installed in its busiest UK store. The new concept store in central London is an attempt to return to its roots. The chain had previously scrapped a similar refillable scheme two decades ago due to lack of shopper demand and confusion on how it worked. Times are different now and it if felt the new initiative could have real traction in the market.  The Body Shop’s trial refill station will initially just be for shower gel. The Bond Street store will also include a water station for shoppers to refill their beverage bottles. Aspects of the pilot are likely to be rolled out to stores in Europe and North America if successful. see also Beauty product refill initiative hits UK high street.

 

More info in The Innovation Zone.


#4 Reusable box is a nod to e-commerce packaging future

The fast evolving e-commerce sector is seeing some significant changes in packaging design to improve both functionality as well as to increase sustainability. DS Smith has recently helped a leading UK premium clothing brand with a new recyclable e-commerce pack. The reusable box has been developed for Ted Baker. The retailer was aiming to further improve on the 27% of its boxes that are reused every year. To accompany the new box, a reusable and resealable sleeve has been designed. A sleeve helps to protect the parcel during transportation. It also means that consumers can return unwanted items in the very same box by simply reversing the sleeve and putting it back around the box. It arrives back to the depot label-free so can be used again for other customer orders, doing up to three additional courier journeys.  See also One-piece corrugated box can be turned inside-out for returns or gifting.

More info in The Innovation Zone.


 

Please visit ThePackHub or call us on +44(0)118 963 9990 to find out more about the range of packaging innovation services we offer. We’ve delivered projects for a number of brand owner, retailer and packaging suppliers.

Until next time. Happy innovating.


ThePackHub Ltd 3 Redlands Court, Chapel Lane, Shotteswell, Banbury, OX17 1JB . Tel: 0118 963 9990 . Email us >